Oracle SecureFiles | In 11.2 extended to Oracle Database File System – DBFS

Hi All!
I was reviewing some features in Oracle and, basically, every single time I review them I find something new. Seems Oracle Databases’ features are near to infinite and we frequently find some that can really add value to our solutions.

So I decided to make a serie of posts with really quick notes about each one of them.
You can see all posts in this serie in my page of posts and some others more.

Ready? Here it goes:

Oracle SecureFiles | In 11.2 extended to Oracle Database File System – DBFS

In version 11g Oracle introduced SecureFiles, a new LOB storage architecture as replacement for BASICFILES LOBs’storage, being faster than Unix files to read/write. Lots of potential benefits for OLAP analytic workspaces are expected, as the LOBs used to hold AWs have historically been very slow to write. In addition, this object type is compliant to other mechanisms like deduplication, compression and encryption. Besides that, lock and concurrency model has been improved to manage those kind of objects. Other improvements like space management, reduced fragmentation, intelligent pre-fetching, new network layer, no LOB index contention, no high water mark contention and being easier to manage are important to mention.

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11g+ Features: Extended Statistics

Hi All!
I was reviewing some features in Oracle and, basically, every single time I review them I find something new. Seems Oracle Databases’ features are near to infinite and we frequently find some that can really add value to our solutions.

So I decided to make a serie of posts with really quick notes about each one of them.
You can see all posts in this serie in my page of posts and some others more.

Ready? Here it goes:

Extended Statistics

One of the most expected features of Oracle 11g is improvements to the dbms_stats package, specifically the ability to aid complex queries by providing extended statistics to the cost-based optimizer (CBO).

The 11g extended statistics are intended to improve the optimizers guesses for the cardinality of combined columns and columns that are modified by a built-in or user-defined function. In Oracle 10g dynamic sampling can be used to provide inter-table cardinality estimates, but dynamic sampling has important limitations. However, the 11g create_extended_stats in dbms_stats relieves much of the problem of sub-optimal table join orders allowing for extended statistics on correlated columns.

One of the expectation is to avoid using the ORDERED hint, one of the most popular SQL tuning hints, used to to specify that the tables be joined together in the same order that they appear in the FROM clause.

This feature can be controlled by hidden parameter:

_optimizer_enable_extended_stats in case of SQL Performance regression.

 

You can also see more detailed material here:
About improvements on 18c (yeah, lots of things on 12c and 18c).
Oracle 12c: Automatic Column Group Detection in Oracle Database 12c Release 1 (12.1)
Oracle Base: Extended Statistics on 11gR2.

Cheers!

Database Resident Connection Pool (DRCP)

Hi All!
I was reviewing some features in Oracle and, basically, every single time I review them I find something new. Seems Oracle Databases’ features are near to infinite and we frequently find some that can really add value to our solutions.

So I decided to make a serie of posts with really quick notes about each one of them.
You can see all posts in this serie in my page of posts and some others more.

Ready? Here it goes:

Database Resident Connection Pool

The database resident connection pool (DRCP) reduces the resource requirements of applications that currently don’t support connection pooling, either because it is not supported by the application infrastructure, or it has not been implemented. DRCP is only supported for database connections using the OCI driver.

The pool is managed using the DBMS_CONNECTION_POOL package. he DRCP is started and stopped using the START_POOL and STOP_POOL procedures respectively.

SQL> EXEC DBMS_CONNECTION_POOL.start_pool;

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

SQL> EXEC DBMS_CONNECTION_POOL.stop_pool;

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

The ALTER_PARAM procedure allows you to configure an individual pool parameter, while the CONFIGURE_POOL allows you to configure all pool parameters in one call. The default settings are restored using the RESTORE_DEFAULTS procedure. The pool parameters that are currently supported are listed below:

PROCEDURE CONFIGURE_POOL
 Argument Name                  Type                    In/Out Default?
 ------------------------------ ----------------------- ------ --------
 POOL_NAME                      VARCHAR2                IN     DEFAULT
 MINSIZE                        BINARY_INTEGER          IN     DEFAULT
 MAXSIZE                        BINARY_INTEGER          IN     DEFAULT
 INCRSIZE                       BINARY_INTEGER          IN     DEFAULT
 SESSION_CACHED_CURSORS         BINARY_INTEGER          IN     DEFAULT
 INACTIVITY_TIMEOUT             BINARY_INTEGER          IN     DEFAULT
 MAX_THINK_TIME                 BINARY_INTEGER          IN     DEFAULT
 MAX_USE_SESSION                BINARY_INTEGER          IN     DEFAULT
 MAX_LIFETIME_SESSION           BINARY_INTEGER          IN     DEFAULT

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11g Named and Mixed Notation in PL/SQL Subprogram Invocations

Hi All!
I was reviewing some features in Oracle and, basically, every single time I review them I find something new. Seems Oracle Databases’ features are near to infinite and we frequently find some that can really add value to our solutions.

So I decided to make a serie of posts with really quick notes about each one of them.
You can see all posts in this serie in my page of posts and some others more.

Ready? Here it goes:

Named and Mixed Notation in PL/SQL Subprogram Invocations

Prior to 11g, PL/SQL invoked from SQL had to have its parameters passed using positional notation, making it difficult to determine the meaning of parameters. Oracle 11g allows positional, named and mixed notation to be used when calling PL/SQL from SQL. Check example below:

SQL> -- Positional Notation.
SQL> SELECT add_func(10, 20) FROM dual;

add_func(10,20)
----------------
              30

SQL> -- Mixed Notation.
SQL> SELECT add_func(10, p_value_2 => 20) FROM dual;

add_func(10,P_VALUE_2=>20)
---------------------------
                         30

SQL> -- Named Notation.
SQL> SELECT add_func(p_value_1 => 10, p_value_2 => 20) FROM dual;

add_func(P_VALUE_1=>10,P_VALUE_2=>20)
--------------------------------------
                                    30

Cheers!

11g Feature: Fine Grained Dependency Tracking (FGDT)

Hi All!
I was reviewing some features in Oracle and, basically, every single time I review them I find something new. Seems Oracle Databases’ features are near to infinite and we frequently find some that can really add value to our solutions.

So I decided to make a serie of posts with really quick notes about each one of them.
You can see all posts in this serie in my page of posts and some others more.

Ready? Here it goes:

11g Feature: Fine Grained Dependency Tracking (FGDT)

In previous versions, object dependencies were managed at the object level. This way, altering an object automatically invalidated all dependent objects.
Oracle 11g has more granular dependency management, so only changes that directly affect an object will cause an invalidation.

This is not a Feature under control of Dev or DBA, but I judged important to mention here, as per has important impact to development and deployment processes.

More details can be found here: http://www.orafaq.com/node/2683

11g Feature: Fine-Grained Access Control (FGAC) on Network Services

Hi All!
I was reviewing some features in Oracle and, basically, every single time I review them I find something new. Seems Oracle Databases’ features are near to infinite and we frequently find some that can really add value to our solutions.

So I decided to make a serie of posts with really quick notes about each one of them.
You can see all posts in this serie in my page of posts and some others more.

Ready? Here it goes:

Fine-Grained Access Control (FGAC) on Network Services

Oracle supplies PL/SQL utility packages such as UTL_TCP, UTL_SMTP, UTL_MAIL, UTL_HTTP and UTL_INADDR to access to network services. In 11g Oracle have enhanced security available.
Rather than public being granted execute privileges on these packages, now it’s needed to create an ACCESS CONTROL LIST (ACL) in order to use these packages. Some ACL Related Data Dictionary VIEWS are DBA_NETWORK_ACLS and [DBA/USER]_NETWORK_ACL_PRIVILEGES.

> To create ACL:

SQL> begin
DBMS_NETWORK_ACL_ADMIN.create_acl(
acl => 'example.xml',
description=>'EXEMPLE ACL',
principal=>'EXAMPLE',                        
is_grant=>TRUE,
privilege=>'connect');
End;
/

> Once the ACL is created, additional user or privileges can be added using the DBMS_NETWORK_ACL_ADMIN.add_privileges procedure:

SQL> BEGIN
  DBMS_NETWORK_ACL_ADMIN.add_privilege ( 
    acl         =>  'example.xml', 
    principal   => 'SCOTT',
    is_grant    => FALSE, 
    privilege   => 'connect', 
    position    => NULL, 
    start_date  => NULL,
    end_date    => NULL);
  COMMIT;
END;
/

* DBMS_NETWORK_ACL_ADMIN.delete_privileges can be usedto drop privileges and DBMS_NETWORK_ACL_ADMIN.drop_acl to drop ACL.

> To assign ACL to a Network Host:

SQL> begin
DBMS_NETWORK_ACL_ADMIN.assign_acl(
acl => 'example.xml',
host=>'grepora');
End;
/

See you next week!

11g Feature: PLS-00436 Restriction in FORALL Statements Removed

Hi All!
I was reviewing some features in Oracle and, basically, every single time I review them I find something new. Seems Oracle Databases’ features are near to infinite and we frequently find some that can really add value to our solutions.

So I decided to make a serie of posts with really quick notes about each one of them.
You can see all posts in this serie in my page of posts and some others more.

Ready? Here it goes:

11g Feature: PLS-00436 Restriction in FORALL Statements Removed

In 11g, the PLS-00436 restriction has been removed, meaning individual elements of a collection can be referenced with SET and WHERE clauses in a FORALL construction.

Please check the following example, setting text of my_table to ‘Line x’ where x is the line number (also ID column):

DECLARE
  TYPE t_test IS TABLE OF my_table%ROWTYPE;
  l_test t_test;
BEGIN
  SELECT * BULK COLLECT INTO l_test FROM my_table;
  
  FOR i IN l_test.first .. l_test.last LOOP
    l_test(i).text := 'Line ' || i;
  END LOOP;

  FORALL i IN l_test.first .. l_test.last
    UPDATE my_table SET text = l_test(i).text WHERE id = l_test(i).id;
  COMMIT;
END;
/