DG Broker ORA-16766: Redo Apply is stopped after a Database Restart

So, the other day I was engaged to check a dataguard, while checking its status with the dg broker I found this error

Error: ORA-16766: Redo Apply is stopped

Checking for it on dg broker:

DGMGRL> show configuration verbose

Configuration - DGCONFIG

Protection Mode: MaxPerformance
Databases:
PRIMARY - Primary database
STANDBY - Physical standby database
Error: ORA-16766: Redo Apply is stopped

Properties:
FastStartFailoverThreshold = '30'
OperationTimeout = '30'
FastStartFailoverLagLimit = '30'
CommunicationTimeout = '180'
ObserverReconnect = '0'
FastStartFailoverAutoReinstate = 'TRUE'
FastStartFailoverPmyShutdown = 'TRUE'
BystandersFollowRoleChange = 'ALL'
ObserverOverride = 'FALSE'
ExternalDestination1 = ''
ExternalDestination2 = ''
PrimaryLostWriteAction = 'CONTINUE'

Fast-Start Failover: DISABLED

Configuration Status:
ERROR

GMGRL> show database verbose STANDBY

Database - STANDBY

Enterprise Manager Name: STANDBY
Role: PHYSICAL STANDBY
Intended State: APPLY-ON
Transport Lag: 0 seconds (computed 3 seconds ago)
Apply Lag: 1 hour(s) 50 minutes 6 seconds (computed 0 seconds ago)
Apply Rate: 828.00 KByte/s
Real Time Query: OFF
Instance(s):
STANDBY

Database Error(s):
ORA-16766: Redo Apply is stopped

Properties:
DGConnectIdentifier = 'STANDBY'
ObserverConnectIdentifier = ''
LogXptMode = 'ASYNC'
DelayMins = '0'
Binding = 'optional'
MaxFailure = '0'
MaxConnections = '1'
ReopenSecs = '300'
NetTimeout = '30'
RedoCompression = 'DISABLE'
LogShipping = 'ON'
PreferredApplyInstance = ''
ApplyInstanceTimeout = '0'
ApplyParallel = 'AUTO'
StandbyFileManagement = 'AUTO'
ArchiveLagTarget = '900'
LogArchiveMaxProcesses = '4'
LogArchiveMinSucceedDest = '1'
DbFileNameConvert = ''
LogFileNameConvert = ''
FastStartFailoverTarget = ''
InconsistentProperties = '(monitor)'
InconsistentLogXptProps = '(monitor)'
SendQEntries = '(monitor)'
LogXptStatus = '(monitor)'
RecvQEntries = '(monitor)'
ApplyLagThreshold = '0'
TransportLagThreshold = '0'
TransportDisconnectedThreshold = '30'
SidName = 'STANDBY'
StaticConnectIdentifier = '(DESCRIPTION=(ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=tcp)(HOST=SB_SERVER)(PORT=1521))(CONNECT_DATA=(SERVICE_NAME=STANDBY_DGMGRL)(INSTANCE_NAME=STANDBY)(SERVER=DEDICATED)))'
StandbyArchiveLocation = 'USE_DB_RECOVERY_FILE_DEST'
AlternateLocation = ''
LogArchiveTrace = '0'
LogArchiveFormat = 'STANDBY_%r_%t_%s.arc'
TopWaitEvents = '(monitor)'

Database Status:
ERROR

The standby state was APPLY-ON but when checked the standby if the MRP process was running I found none!

sqlplus / as sysdba

SQL*Plus: Release 11.2.0.4.0 Production on Fri Jan 4 17:05:12 2019

Copyright (c) 1982, 2013, Oracle. All rights reserved.


Connected to:
Oracle Database 11g Enterprise Edition Release 11.2.0.4.0 - 64bit Production
With the Partitioning, Automatic Storage Management, OLAP, Data Mining
and Real Application Testing options

17:05:12 SYS@STANDBY AS SYSDBA> SELECT PROCESS, STATUS FROM v$managed_standby;

PROCESS STATUS
--------- ------------
ARCH CLOSING
ARCH CLOSING
ARCH CLOSING
ARCH CLOSING
RFS IDLE
RFS IDLE
RFS IDLE
RFS WRITING

8 rows selected.

Elapsed: 00:00:00.01

Checking further I found that the database was bounced while the MRP was running and that was the only explanation that I could see to see a difference between the dg broker also I could not find any error in the dg broker log $ORACLE_HOME/rdbms/log/drc*.log

After setting the state to apply-off and them to apply-on the issue was resolved.

DGMGRL> edit database STANDBY set state='apply-off';
Succeeded.
DGMGRL> edit database STANDBY set state='apply-on';
Succeeded.
DGMGRL> show database verbose STANDBY;

Database - STANDBY

Enterprise Manager Name: STANDBY
Role: PHYSICAL STANDBY
Intended State: APPLY-ON
Transport Lag: 0 seconds (computed 1 second ago)
Apply Lag: 0 seconds (computed 1 second ago)
Apply Rate: 0 Byte/s
Real Time Query: OFF
Instance(s):
STANDBY

Properties:
DGConnectIdentifier = 'STANDBY'
ObserverConnectIdentifier = ''
LogXptMode = 'ASYNC'
DelayMins = '0'
Binding = 'optional'
MaxFailure = '0'
MaxConnections = '1'
ReopenSecs = '300'
NetTimeout = '30'
RedoCompression = 'DISABLE'
LogShipping = 'ON'
PreferredApplyInstance = ''
ApplyInstanceTimeout = '0'
ApplyParallel = 'AUTO'
StandbyFileManagement = 'AUTO'
ArchiveLagTarget = '900'
LogArchiveMaxProcesses = '4'
LogArchiveMinSucceedDest = '1'
DbFileNameConvert = ''
LogFileNameConvert = ''
FastStartFailoverTarget = ''
InconsistentProperties = '(monitor)'
InconsistentLogXptProps = '(monitor)'
SendQEntries = '(monitor)'
LogXptStatus = '(monitor)'
RecvQEntries = '(monitor)'
ApplyLagThreshold = '0'
TransportLagThreshold = '0'
TransportDisconnectedThreshold = '30'
SidName = 'STANDBY'
StaticConnectIdentifier = '(DESCRIPTION=(ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=tcp)(HOST=SB_SERVER)(PORT=1521))(CONNECT_DATA=(SERVICE_NAME=STANDBY_DGMGRL)(INSTANCE_NAME=STANDBY)(SERVER=DEDICATED)))'
StandbyArchiveLocation = 'USE_DB_RECOVERY_FILE_DEST'
AlternateLocation = ''
LogArchiveTrace = '0'
LogArchiveFormat = 'STANDBY_%r_%t_%s.arc'
TopWaitEvents = '(monitor)'

Database Status:
SUCCESS

DGMGRL> show configuration

Configuration - DGCONFIG

Protection Mode: MaxPerformance
Databases:
PRIMARY - Primary database
STANDBY - Physical standby database

Fast-Start Failover: DISABLED

Configuration Status:
SUCCESS

DGMGRL> exit

sqlplus / as sysdba
17:17:54 SYS@STANDBY AS SYSDBA> SELECT PROCESS, STATUS FROM v$managed_standby;

PROCESS STATUS
--------- ------------
ARCH CLOSING
ARCH CLOSING
ARCH CLOSING
ARCH CLOSING
RFS IDLE
RFS IDLE
RFS IDLE
RFS IDLE
MRP0 APPLYING_LOG

9 rows selected.

Elapsed: 00:00:00.00

Hope it helps, unti the next one.

Elisson Almeida

 

OEM Metric “Memory Utilization” Different on 12c and 13c

So, as rollout strategy we created a new OEM13c to decommission a 12c. However during the testes, noticed Memory Utilization metric was a lot different between 12c and 13c. Why?

Happens that the Memory Utilization is calculated differently between 12c and 13c, but also seems 13c is more accurate, as per MOS The Host Memory Utilization Percentage Calculation in Enterprise Manager Cloud Control (Doc ID 1908853.1)

Well, those who are familiar with memory use computations in the operating system might become confused when examining the memory use metric data from Enterprise Manager 12c and 13c Cloud Control. Metrics such as Memory Utilization (%) do not have an equivalent in the OS, but OS data will be used in its derivation.

This is the formula used by Enterprise Manager 12.1.0.3 for Linux Memory Utilization (%), for example:

Memory Utilization (%) = (100.0 * (activeMem) / realMem)
 = 100 * 25046000/99060536
 = 25.28
EM Shows : 25.5

* On this, activeMem is Active Memory (Active), and realMem is Total Memory (MemTotal).

Comparing this with MemFree, which is not valid, might provide an impression that utilization is not being accurately represented.

Also, the “OEM13c value” was already collected in OEM12c, but under metric name “Used Logical Memory”. And basically “Memory Utilization” in 12c uses “activeMem” instead of “realMem-(freeMem+Buffers+Cached)”. As per image below.

OEM12_grep_mem

The formula in place on 13c is exactly the same as used to fix MOS EM 13c: Incorrect Memory Utilization Reported for Linux Hosts in Enterprise Manager 13.1.0.0.0 Cloud Control (Doc ID 2144976.1)

Example:

[root@greporasrv ~]# free
             total       used       free     shared    buffers     cached
Mem:     264087460  257669460    6418000    7657500     461088   11008128
-/+ buffers/cache:  246200244   17887216
Swap:     25165820    3365104   21800716

(100.0 * (realMem-(freeMem+Buffers+Cached)) / realMem)
100*(264087460-(6418000+461088+11008128))/264087460) = 93,22678328

As per OEM13c:

OEM13_grep_mem.jpg

Also, by checking on server using SAR, seems value in OEM 13c is more accurate, indeed:

[root@greporasrv ~]# sar -r
Linux 2.6.39-400.294.4.el6uek.x86_64 (greporasrv) 	08/29/2017 	_x86_64_	(44 CPU)

12:00:01 AM kbmemfree kbmemused  %memused kbbuffers  kbcached  kbcommit   %commit
12:10:01 AM   5377540 258709920     97.96    719080  10775828  83876744     29.00
12:20:01 AM   6131220 257956240     97.68    719504  10721084  82467712     28.51
12:30:01 AM   5623060 258464400     97.87    719700  10720972  83456216     28.85
12:40:01 AM   5606572 258480888     97.88    719836  10779108  83228440     28.77
12:50:01 AM   5783256 258304204     97.81    719860  10848644  82925908     28.67
01:00:01 AM   4151148 259936312     98.43    719888  11589048  84400040     29.18
01:10:01 AM   3717000 260370460     98.59    719904  11534336  84838784     29.33
01:20:01 AM   4282412 259805048     98.38    720164  11480792  84047568     29.06
01:30:01 AM   4473128 259614332     98.31    720184  11483604  83857348     28.99
01:40:01 AM   5113136 258974324     98.06    720256  11528492  83036284     28.71
01:50:01 AM   4971036 259116424     98.12    720284  11587956  82955128     28.68
02:00:01 AM   4026540 260060920     98.48    720344  11663184  86489692     29.90
02:10:01 AM   4312916 259774544     98.37    720380  11678316  83834592     28.98
02:20:01 AM   5058980 259028480     98.08    720408  11624028  82876972     28.65
02:30:01 AM   4609908 259477552     98.25    720556  11541392  83871244     29.00
02:40:01 AM   5020668 259066792     98.10    720592  11574912  82887808     28.66
02:50:01 AM   5175916 258911544     98.04    720748  11619572  82725252     28.60
03:00:01 AM   4701236 259386224     98.22    720780  11687100  83421624     28.84
03:10:01 AM   4757976 259329484     98.20    721204  11648864  83298716     28.80
03:20:01 AM   4485280 259602180     98.30    721248  11719272  83299472     28.80
03:30:01 AM   4267068 259820392     98.38    721264  11794688  83683344     28.93
03:40:01 AM   4080264 260007196     98.45    721404  11856796  83863540     28.99
03:50:01 AM   4864276 259223184     98.16    721676  11975372  82735744     28.60
04:00:01 AM   4427284 259660176     98.32    721696  12056676  83450524     28.85
04:10:01 AM   4868184 259219276     98.16    721736  11863420  82860464     28.65
04:20:01 AM   4711608 259375852     98.22    721760  11877192  83205684     28.77
04:30:01 AM   4452764 259634696     98.31    721928  11945108  83515596     28.87
04:40:01 AM   4800700 259286760     98.18    722072  12015444  82681320     28.58
04:50:01 AM   4796588 259290872     98.18    722212  12075496  82703948     28.59
05:00:01 AM   4320164 259767296     98.36    722372  12164956  83390596     28.83
05:10:01 AM   3350940 260736520     98.73    722488  12120116  84525028     29.22
05:20:01 AM   4200236 259887224     98.41    722628  11965996  83510580     28.87
05:30:01 AM   4028020 260059440     98.47    722640  12019516  83720748     28.94
05:40:01 AM   3929740 260157720     98.51    722720  12069520  83632964     28.91
05:50:01 AM   2719452 261368008     98.97    723460  14408924  83745112     28.95
06:00:01 AM   1530448 262557012     99.42    723644  14943264  84618304     29.25
06:10:01 AM   2925268 261162192     98.89    605748  13363596  84792452     29.31
06:20:02 AM   3235532 260851928     98.77    605916  13811664  83516740     28.87
06:30:01 AM   3265640 260821820     98.76    606072  13848028  83385196     28.83
06:40:01 AM   2102756 261984704     99.20    606232  14745508  83638764     28.92
06:50:01 AM   2386376 261701084     99.10    606644  14821232  83118484     28.74
07:00:01 AM   5343496 258743964     97.98    186908  12019804  84375032     29.17
07:10:01 AM   5073472 259013988     98.08    219044  12597104  83579876     28.90
07:20:01 AM   5380380 258707080     97.96    241300  12600412  83107160     28.73
07:30:01 AM   5063504 259023956     98.08    253984  12653840  83373804     28.82
07:40:01 AM   8241032 255846428     96.88    269960   9772232  83072188     28.72
07:50:01 AM   8549616 255537844     96.76    278472   9853288  82646916     28.57
08:00:01 AM   8185864 255901596     96.90    287296   9938816  83179808     28.76
08:10:01 AM   7797504 256289956     97.05    295856  10029904  83464160     28.86
08:20:01 AM   8813696 255273764     96.66    302620   9930672  82081220     28.38
08:30:01 AM   8574984 255512476     96.75    309156   9880124  82557600     28.54
08:40:01 AM   8010072 256077388     96.97    314804   9912220  83241764     28.78
08:50:01 AM   8791112 255296348     96.67    319568   9980532  81787424     28.28

Oracle memory usage on Linux / Unix

Hi all,

So one of the most important things that we need to do when setting up a new server or checking the capacity of the server is to see how much memory Oracle is using.

When checking the capacity there are some practical things that always help me to get a fast glimpse of the system:

  • When opening topas and hitting M you will see this below
Topas Monitor for host: SERVER1 Interval: 2 Sat Dec 8 03:39:59 2019
================================================================================
REF1 SRAD TOTALMEM INUSE FREE FILECACHE HOMETHRDS CPUS
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
0 0 59.8G 59.6G 212.3 16.3G 528 0-15
1 1 61.4G 61.2G 188.8 15.7G 536 16-31

On the memory session you will see 3 categories, INUSE, FREE and FILECACHE. There you may see what is being using for what but there is not much granularity there.

  • When using top you have this summary below
top - 11:48:08 up 119 days, 10:18, 1 user, load average: 26.76, 26.16, 25.95
Tasks: 1936 total, 38 running, 1898 sleeping, 0 stopped, 0 zombie
Cpu(s): 79.3%us, 1.1%sy, 0.0%ni, 15.1%id, 4.3%wa, 0.0%hi, 0.1%si, 0.0%st
Mem: 263750172k total, 219075656k used, 44674516k free, 797476k buffers
Swap: 16773116k total, 505760k used, 16267356k free, 88055108k cached

Same you have a high level usage. So here comes the question:

How are you to prove that you have a memory shortage?

I often use vmstat on Linux looking on the columns si and so equals to 0 (swap in and swap out) and when the free command, the free column you will also have no or very low swap being used

/home/oracle> vmstat 1
procs -----------memory---------- ---swap-- -----io---- --system-- -----cpu-----
r b swpd free buff cache si so bi bo in cs us sy id wa st
15 3 505760 44896608 797480 88062288 0 0 7037 1304 0 0 29 2 61 8 0
16 1 505760 44922964 797480 88062320 0 0 432272 144314 38784 31348 41 2 52 5 0
14 2 505760 44943072 797480 88062320 0 0 468904 155424 32676 27522 34 1 60 5 0
15 2 505760 44943032 797480 88062328 0 0 431032 144275 32596 27469 34 1 60 5 0
15 2 505760 44920136 797480 88062352 0 0 396232 145052 30772 26657 32 1 62 6 0
19 1 505760 44928576 797480 88062360 0 0 429360 160158 33640 28012 36 1 58 5 0
15 3 505760 44935340 797480 88062368 0 0 477232 161849 28393 21423 41 1 53 5 0
17 1 505760 44924744 797480 88062368 0 0 515265 160212 27478 20578 40 1 54 5 0
16 1 505760 44921596 797480 88062368 0 0 495408 159304 25458 19548 37 1 58 5 0
18 1 505760 44918144 797480 88062384 0 0 552880 168895 28203 22774 38 1 56 5 0
15 2 505760 44922344 797480 88062392 0 0 546920 160463 25321 19151 37 1 58 5 0
16 4 505760 44921544 797480 88062400 0 0 571544 153810 25429 20011 36 1 58 5 0
16 1 505760 44919620 797480 88062400 0 0 577552 160004 27132 20111 40 1 54 5 0
19 2 505760 44360240 797480 88062400 0 0 584969 155553 29467 22145 41 2 52 5 0
/home/oracle> free
total used free shared buffers cached
Mem: 263750172 219060896 44689276 91608 797480 88062464
-/+ buffers/cache: 130200952 133549220
Swap: 16773116 505760 16267356

To check a process specific memory usage (RSS) I often use ps along with other commands to calculate the process memory for a specific process id as below:

/home/oracle> ps -eo rss,pid,euser,lstart,args:100 --sort %mem | grep -v grep | grep 35796 | awk '{printf $1/1024 "MB"; $1=""; print }'| sort
19.6016MB 35796 oracle Sat Sep 8 02:43:54 2018 ora_lg00_ORC1
34.957MB 32340 oracle Sat Jan 5 11:50:09 2019 oracleORC1 (LOCAL=NO)

RSS is resident memory, but when comes to shared memory like the Oracle SGA the methods above could be miss leading – not to say wrong – but as Oracle memory is shared we may see double counting on the results. I sometimes use pmap to check a process memory as well when available

/home/oracle> pmap 35796
35796: ora_lg00_ORC1
total 0K

But, still when checking a server wide scope, do you want to keep doing manual work and lots of math? I don’t think so. 🙂

That’s why when I came across SMEM made my life a lot easier. It is a python script which gives you a nice breakdown of the memory usage and without the miss leading double counting.

You can see the commands and processes and their memory:

[root@srv01 smem-1.4]# ./smem -trk | head
PID User Command Swap USS PSS RSS
4829 root /opt/stackdriver/collectd/s 444.0K 4.0G 4.0G 4.0G
5647 oracle asm_gen0_+ASM 50.1M 424.4M 425.0M 437.8M
16512 oracle rman software/product/11.2. 0 172.9M 173.7M 177.8M
85107 oracle ora_n001_db01 42.3M 147.8M 147.8M 185.8M
85103 oracle ora_n000_db01 42.4M 146.5M 146.6M 184.6M
85109 oracle ora_n002_db01 42.2M 145.6M 145.6M 183.5M
85111 oracle ora_n003_db01 42.1M 145.1M 145.2M 183.1M
7287 oracle ora_dia0_db01 1.6M 68.6M 68.8M 107.8M

As well the overall server per user:

root@srv01 smem-1.4]# ./smem -turk 
User Count Swap USS PSS RSS oracle 1358 4.8G 7.8G 8.0G 76.6G 
root 43 12.0M 4.1G 4.1G 4.2G user1 10 0 321.0M 328.0M 369.2M 
nobody 2 96.0K 2.1M 2.3M 6.0M user2 2 0 684.0K 1.7M 7.7M 
user4 2 0 632.0K 1.7M 7.9M user4 1 72.0K 536.0K 540.0K 2.1M 
ntp 1 424.0K 332.0K 368.0K 2.4M 
smmsp 1 1.3M 160.0K 298.0K 1.9M 
rpc 1 336.0K 68.0K 73.0K 1.7M 
rpcuser 1 808.0K 4.0K 16.0K 1.9M 
--------------------------------------------------- 
1422 4.8G 12.2G 12.5G 81.3G

Hope it helps, see you next time!

Oracle 11g / 12c identified by values – set an Oracle password to its current value without knowing the password

This post will be a quick one. I needed to set a Oracle password as it was about to expire but the client did not want to change the password itself.

The simplest way to get the encrypted password was:

select name, password from sys.user$ where name=‘USER’;

But after Oracle 11g/12c seems a better option for security ends to use DBMS_METADATA.get_ddl or select the spare4 column on sys.user$

select name, spare4 from sys.user$ where name=‘USER’;

or

set long 9999999
set longc 9999999
select dbms_metadata.get_ddl('USER','DBSNMP') from dual;

And how to set this password back to the user?

alter user [USER] identified by values '[encrypted password]';

 

Hope it helps!

MySQL: Sed for Scripts using “Show” from Command Line

Hi all,
So, a pretty basics one today… But useful to have handy. How to script an output from  mysql -B -e?

Easy, by using SED. Ok, by replacements are always tricky considering the line braking and etc. So, here goes an example with show tables:

Original Output.

[root@greporasrv ~]# mysql sbtest -B -e 'show tables'
Tables_in_sbtest
sbtest1
sbtest10
sbtest2
sbtest3
sbtest4
sbtest5
sbtest6
sbtest7
sbtest8
sbtest9
Cool, now with all in one line:
[root@greporasrv ~]# mysql sbtest -B -e 'show tables'|sed ':a;N;$!ba;s/\n/ /g'
Tables_in_sbtest sbtest1 sbtest10 sbtest2 sbtest3 sbtest4 sbtest5 sbtest6 sbtest7 sbtest8 sbtest9

Great, so let’s put some useful code on it:

[root@greporasrv ~]# mysql sbtest -B -e 'show tables'|sed ':a;N;$!ba;s/\n/ engine=innodb; \n alter table /g'
Tables_in_sbtest engine=innodb;
alter table sbtest1 engine=innodb;
alter table sbtest10 engine=innodb;
alter table sbtest2 engine=innodb;
alter table sbtest3 engine=innodb;
alter table sbtest4 engine=innodb;
alter table sbtest5 engine=innodb;
alter table sbtest6 engine=innodb;
alter table sbtest7 engine=innodb;
alter table sbtest8 engine=innodb;
alter table sbtest9 engine=innodb;

Hope you can use for your needs.

Cheers!

Amazon EC2: X11 Forwarding After Sudo SSH Session

Hello all!

So, now with more use of resources like Cloud servers, more and more silent instalations are being done, right? Myself, I do it in silent always I can.

What if I need to export X. Plus, if I need to export it from user oracle, but I can only login with ec2-user, as usual?

Here is the process for that:

1) Connect to AWS EC2 instance

[user@securehost ~]$ ssh -X ec2-user@ipaddress
Last login: Fri Dec 7 14:41:41 2018 from grepora.srv.com
__| __|_ )
 _| ( / Amazon Linux AMI
 ___|\___|___|
https://aws.amazon.com/amazon-linux-ami/2018.03-release-notes/
13 package(s) needed for security, out of 16 available
Run "sudo yum update" to apply all updates.

2) Test xclock works from ec2-user

[ec2-user@ipaddress ~]$ xclock
Warning: Missing charsets in String to FontSet conversion
^C

3) Show all magic cookie

[ec2-user@ipaddress ~]$ xauth list
ipaddress/unix:12 MIT-MAGIC-COOKIE-1 7e53e7600ff4177d7bbc66bde0a1b1ca
ipaddress/unix:11 MIT-MAGIC-COOKIE-1 e3d1a8915484c929ef3e809b047e6352
ipaddress/unix:10 MIT-MAGIC-COOKIE-1 07b3de3093cef835c19239ea952231b7

4) Show DISPLAY variable

[ec2-user@ipaddress ~]$ env|grep DISPLAY
DISPLAY=localhost:10.0

5) Create /tmp/xauth based on current DISPLAY variable

[ec2-user@ipaddress ~]$ xauth list | grep unix`echo $DISPLAY | cut -c10-12` > /tmp/xauth
[ec2-user@ipaddress ~]$ ll /tmp/xauth ; cat /tmp/xauth 
-rw-rw-r-- 1 ec2-user ec2-user 78 Dec 7 14:47 /tmp/xauth
ipaddress/unix:10 MIT-MAGIC-COOKIE-1 07b3de3093cef835c19239ea952231b7

6) Sudo to oracle

[ec2-user@ipaddress ~]$ sudo su - oracle
Last login: Fri Dec 7 14:43:12 UTC 2018 on pts/0

7) Add and Verify xauth

[oracle@ipaddress ~]$ xauth add `cat /tmp/xauth`
[oracle@ipaddress ~]$ xauth list
ipaddress/unix:10 MIT-MAGIC-COOKIE-1 07b3de3093cef835c19239ea952231b7

8) Verify and Add DISPLAY variable

[oracle@ipaddress ~]$ env|grep DISPLAY
[oracle@ipaddress ~]$ export DISPLAY=localhost:10.0

9) Test xclock works from oracle

[oracle@ipaddress ~]$ xclock
Warning: Missing charsets in String to FontSet conversion
^C
[oracle@ipaddress ~]$

Now you should be able to see the clock and so other graphical resources, like DBCA and so on.

Hope it helps!

Statspack top queries script by elapsed time

Hi all,

I was engaged on a report request that I needed to gather to get the TOP SQL by elapsed time and using Statspack. I got those and than I was asked to it on the following week and on the following, and you may see when this is going. So I created a script which would give is a report and I would not have to do it manually ever again 🙂

Usage: long_run_sql.sh [-h ] [ -r 

Where:
If no parameters are used 120 minutes and 7 days will be used as default for History, 5 minutes for current running
-r = Set the time in minutes for the current running SQLs
-o = Specifies the minutes to be used for the long running SQLs History
-d = set the time period wanted for the execution history, default is 7 days
-h = Shows this help message

Might still have some bugs but it well enough to share here 🙂

You have some parameters that you need to change at the top, to suite your environment and of course have Statspack working and change the sqlplus connection line

Some tweaks are required as no 2 environments are never 100% alike. But still forth the work.

#!/bin/bash
#---------------------------------------------------------------------------
# Creates a report, using statspack, of the long running sqls from database
#
# History:
# Feb-21-2018 - Elisson Almeida - Created.
#---------------------------------------------------------------------------
#usage
### Environment setup
### Global variables
DIR=/home/oracle/scripts
LOG=/home/oracle/logs
DATE=$(date +%Y%m%d_%H%M%S)
NAME=long_running_sql_report
OUTPUT_FILE=${LOG}/${NAME}_${DATE}.log
ERROR_FILE=${LOG}/${NAME}.err
TMP_FILE=$DIR/$.tmp
CONFIG_EMAIL_TO=
PATH=
ORACLE_SID=
ORACLE_BASE=
ORACLE_HOME=
#tns-admin if needed otherwise comment out
#TNS_ADMIN
RUNNING=5
HISTORY=120
Help()
{
echo "Usage: long_run_sql.sh [-h ] [ -r 

Hope it helps!

Elisson Almeida

Managing listener.log and log.xml with Linux Logrotate

Hi all,
To manage Oracle trace files the way to go is ADRCI. You can see this post from Matheus if you have not read it yet.

In the last part of the script we have a small bash code to configure the ADRCI on all databases running on a server

You could add:

adrci exec="set home $1;purge -age 10080 -type ALERT";

In this case the age parameter is in minutes but still you would be required to run it periodically which could be another script in crontab to be managed.

SO the solution that I found to be best as it takes leverage from an existing solution is called logrotate.

Logrotate is a Unix/Linix based program that helps as its name says, rotate any file that you need. You just need to create a configuration file and place it on /etc/logrotate.d on most Linuxes distributions.

But when you have a server with several databases and listerners and more, it starts to get a bit tedious and time consuming to create this manually.

In this post on the Pythian Blog, will find how to create but it does not handle the listener.log but not the log.xml so I added this piece here

for L in `\ps -ef | grep tnslsnr | grep -v grep | sed s'/-.*$//g' | awk '{print $NF}'`
do
OUT=${DEST}/"logrotate_xml_"${L}
LSRN_LOG=`lsnrctl status ${L} | grep "Listener Log File" | awk '{print $NF}'`
echo ${LSRN_LOG%.*}"*" " {" > ${OUT}
cat << ! >> ${OUT}
daily
rotate 1
compress
notifempty
}
!
echo ${OUT} has been generated
done

Using logroate really helps on the managing on Oracle related files which are not done by ADRCI.

Hope it helps,

Elisson

OMSPatcher finds that previous patching session is not yet completed – What to do?

Hey all,
As usual, a client reached out with this issue:

OMSPatcher finds that previous patching session is not yet completed.
Please refer log file "/u01/app/oracle/middleware/cfgtoollogs/omspatcher/28018178/omspatcher_2018-07-09_23-44-58PM_deploy.log" 
for the previous session and execute the script "/u01/app/oracle/middleware/.omspatcher_storage/oms_session/scripts_2018-07-09_23-44-39PM/run_script_singleoms_resume.sh"  to complete the previous session. OMSPatcher can proceed to execute new operations only if previous session is completed successfully.

Interesting, right?
This means a patch execution in July failed and it wasn’t noticed.

What to do? Point is, the error itself already say what needs to be done.
You just may want to make it properly. How? Here is a quick Action Plan:

ZER0) Check the Deploy log to understand the root cause for the failure on previous patch and fix it.

In my case?
Not all required components were down.

A simple “stop oms” stops only the OMS managed server, JVMD engine, and HTTP server but leaves Node Manager and Administration Server running.
However, a “stop oms -all” stops all Enterprise Manager processes including Administration Server, OMS, HTTP Server, Node Manager, Management Server, JVMD engine, and Oracle BI Publisher (if it is configured on the host). This was the fixing.

Step-by-Step:

1. Blackout targets to avoid unwanted pages.
– On OEM: Enterprise–>Monitoring–>Blackouts

2. Shutdown OMS and AGENT

cd $AGENT_HOME/bin
./emctl stop agent
cd $OMS_HOME/bin
./emctl stop oms -all

3. Resume Patching with issue (with provided command)
(in my case):

/u01/app/oracle/middleware/.omspatcher_storage/oms_session/scripts_218-07-09_23-44-39PM/run_script_singleoms_resume.sh

4. Verify patches got installed

$OMS_HOME/OPatch/opatch lsinventory
$OMS_HOME/OMSPatcher/omspatcher lspatches

5. Start the OMS and agent

cd $AGENT_HOME/bin
./emctl start agent
cd $OMS_HOME/bin
./emctl start oms
./emctl status oms -details

6. Sync EMCLI with server changes:

$OMS_HOME/bin/emcli login -username=sysman
Enter password : <-- sysman password
$OMS_HOME/bin/emcli sync

Continue reading

Disabling PL/SQL Warnings

Hi all!
So, the DBA keep insisting that the Procedure need to compile without warnings? Easy!
This is actually a nice option if you are compiling a code in a client and don’t want to show that your code has warnings, which is kind of ok, once it’s almost impossible to code without warnings.

And this is not even new. Have a look on this documentation from 10.2.

Ok, so how to do it?

ALTER SESSION SET plsql_warnings = 'disable:all';

Have a look in the example below:

SQL> CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE plw5001
  2  IS
  3     a   BOOLEAN;
  4     a   PLS_INTEGER;
  5  BEGIN
  6     a := 1;
  7     DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line ('Will not compile?');
  8  END plw5001;
  9  /
Warning: Procedure created with compilation errors.

SQL>
SQL> SHOW ERRORS
Errors for PROCEDURE PLW5001:

LINE/COL ERROR
-------- -----------------------------------------------------------------
4/4 PLW-05001: previous use of 'A' (at line 3) conflicts with this
use

6/4 PL/SQL: Statement ignored
6/4 PLS-00371: at most one declaration for 'A' is permitted
SQL>
SQL> ALTER SESSION SET plsql_warnings = 'disable:all';

Session altered.

SQL>
SQL> CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE plw5001
2 IS
3 a BOOLEAN;
4 a PLS_INTEGER;
5 BEGIN
6 DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line ('Will not compile?');
7 END plw5001;
8 /

Procedure created.