Kludge: Mounting ACFS Thought Shellscript

Just the script. The history is here.
This is a “workaround” script. As always, is recommended to use Oracle Restart, like I posted here.

#!/bin/sh
$GRID_HOME/bin/srvctl add filesystem -d /dev/asm/dbhome-270 -g 'DGHOME' -v DBHOME -m /oracle/db -u oracle
if [ $? = "0" -o $? = "2" ]; then
$GRID_HOME/bin/srvctl start filesystem -d /dev/asm/dbhome-270
if [ $? = "0" ]; then
chown oracle:oinstall /oracle/db
chmod 775 /oracle/db
$GRID_HOME/bin/srvctl status filesystem -d /dev/asm/dbhome-270
exit 0
fi
$GRID_HOME/bin/srvctl status filesystem -d /dev/asm/dbhome-270
fi

There is a good post ACFS and ACFS restart scripting:
https://levipereira.wordpress.com/2011/07/28/oracle-acfs-filesystem-managed-by-ohas-on-oracle-restart/

See ya!

Matheus.

Flush DNS on Linux

I began posting about ORA-12514 after database migration involving DNS adjustment.
Then, to make it more clear I wrote about How to Flush DNS Cache.

Now, just a complementar information that can be usefull:

# To invalidade DNS Cache:

ls /var/db/nscd/
group hosts netgroup passwd services
 
nscd --invalidate=hosts  (or -i hosts)

Hugs!

Matheus.

Date Format in RMAN: Making better!

I know…
The date format on RMAN it’s not good, but it’s to make it better. Take a look:

db-server>rman target /
Recovery Manager: Release 11.2.0.4.0 - Production on Wed Aug 12 11:00:59 2015
Copyright (c) 1982, 2011, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.
connected to target database: MYDB (DBID=1286311368)
RMAN> list backup of controlfile;
using target database control file instead of recovery catalog
List of Backup Sets
===================
BS Key Type LV Size Device Type Elapsed Time Completion Time
------- ---- -- ---------- ----------- ------------ ---------------
541 Incr 1 17.80M DISK 00:00:01 12-AUG-15
BP Key: 541 Status: AVAILABLE Compressed: NO Tag: BKPINCR_LV1_20150812_0923
Piece Name: +DGFRA/MYDB/backupset/2015_08_12/ncnnn1_bkpincr_lv1_20150812_0923_0.4613.887534683
Control File Included: Ckp SCN: 7301745 Ckp time: 12-AUG-15
RMAN> exit
Recovery Manager complete.

I’ts a simple NLS export on SO before access RMAN:

db-server>export NLS_DATE_FORMAT='yyyy/mm/dd hh24:mi:ss';
db-server>rman target /
Recovery Manager: Release 11.2.0.4.0 - Production on Wed Aug 12 11:05:57 2015
Copyright (c) 1982, 2011, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.
connected to target database: MYDB (DBID=1286311368)
RMAN> list backup of controlfile;
using target database control file instead of recovery catalog
List of Backup Sets
===================
BS Key Type LV Size Device Type Elapsed Time Completion Time
------- ---- -- ---------- ----------- ------------ -------------------
541 Incr 1 17.80M DISK 00:00:01 2015/08/12 09:24:42
BP Key: 541 Status: AVAILABLE Compressed: NO Tag: BKPINCR_LV1_20150812_0923
Piece Name: +DGFRA/MYDB/backupset/2015_08_12/ncnnn1_bkpincr_lv1_20150812_0923_0.4613.887534683
Control File Included: Ckp SCN: 7301745 Ckp time: 2015/08/12 09:24:41

Matheus.

Error: Starting ACFS in RHEL 6 (Can’t exec “/usr/bin/lsb_release”)

Quick tip:

# Error:
[root@db1gridserver1 bin]# ./acfsload start -s
Can’t exec “/usr/bin/lsb_release”: No such file or directory at /grid/product/11.2.0/lib/osds_acfslib.pm line 511.
Use of uninitialized value $LSB_RELEASE in split at /grid/product/11.2.0/lib/osds_acfslib.pm line 516.

# Solution:
[root@db1gridserver1 bin]# yum install redhat-lsb-core-4.0

Note: Bug 17359415 – Linux: Configuring ACFS reports that cannot execute ‘/usr/bin/lsb_release’ (Doc ID 17359415.8)

Matheus.

Manually Mounting ACFS

A server rebooted and I needed to remount the ACFS where the Oracle Home is. About that:
Today’s post: Manually Mounting ACFS
Tomorrow’s Someday’s post: Kludge: Mounting ACFS Thought Shellscript
Day Before Tomorrow’s Another Day’s post: Auto Mounting Cluster Services Through Oracle Restart

But, first, some usefull links:
– ACFS Introduction
– ACFS Advanced
– ACFS Command-Line Utilities

# Manually Mounting ACFS
Checked my $ORACLE_HOME (mounted on ACFS) is not available to start the database. Checked ACFS service is down. So, let’s do all the process:

# Starting ACFS
[root@db1host1p ~]$ $GRID_HOME/bin/acfsload start -s

# Volumes OFFLINE: Let’s Enable it:
[root@db1host1p ~]$ $GRID_HOME/bin/crsctl stat res -t |grep acfs
ora.dghome.sephome.acfs
ONLINE OFFLINE db1host1p
[root@db1host1p ~]$ su - grid
[grid@db1host1p ~]$ asmcmd
ASMCMD> volinfo -a
Diskgroup Name: DGHOME
Volume Name: LVHOME
Volume Device: /dev/asm/lvhome-270
State: DISABLED
Size (MB): 10240
Resize Unit (MB): 32
Redundancy: MIRROR
Stripe Columns: 4
Stripe Width (K): 128
Usage: ACFS
Mountpath: /oracle/MYDB
ASMCMD> volenable -a
ASMCMD> volinfo -a
Diskgroup Name: DGHOME
Volume Name: LVHOME
Volume Device: /dev/asm/lvhome-270
State: ENABLED
Size (MB): 10240
Resize Unit (MB): 32
Redundancy: MIRROR
Stripe Columns: 4
Stripe Width (K): 128
Usage: ACFS
Mountpath: /oracle/MYDB

[root@db1host1p ~]$ $GRID_HOME/bin/crsctl stat res -t |grep acfs
ora.dghome.sephome.acfs
ONLINE ONLINE db1host1p mounted on /oracle/MYDB
ONLINE ONLINE db2host2p mounted on /oracle/MYDB

# As root, let’s mount it:
[root@db1host1p ~]# mount -t acfs /dev/asm/lvhome-270 /oracle/MYDB

# Then, with the $ORACLE_HOME available:
[oracle@db1host1p ~]$ srvctl start instance -d MYDB -i MYDB001

Matheus.

Grepping Entries from Alert.log

Hey hey,
One more McGayver by me! Haha
Again to find some information in alert. This time, I’m looking to count and list all occurrences of an action in alert. To archive this, I made the script below.

grep-swiss-knife-590x295

The functionality is just a little bit more complex than the script of the last post, but stills quite simple. Take a look:

Parameters:
PAR1: name of alert (the main alert.log)
PAR2: Searched token
PAR3: Start day you want to, in the format “Mon dd” or just “Mon”. Below an example.
PAR4: Start Year (4 digits)
PAR5: [optional]End day you want to, in the format “Mon dd” or just “Mon”. The default value is “until now”.
PAR6: [optional]End Year (4 digits). The default value is “until now”. If you use the PAR5, you have to use PAR6.
PAR7: [optional] List All entries and when?. If you want to use this PAR, you must to use PAR5 and PAR6.

Examples (Looking for service reconfigurations):
Ex1: sh grep_entries_alert.sh alert_xxdb_1.log “services=” “Apr 12” 2015
(Seach between April 12 and now and count entries).
Ex2: sh grep_entries_alert.sh alert_xxdb_1.log “services=” “Apr 01” 2015 “May 30” 2015
(Seach between April 01 and May 30 and count the entries).
Ex3: sh grep_entries_alert.sh alert_xxdb_1.log “services=” “Apr 01” 2015 “May 30” 2015 LIST
(Seach between April 01 and May 30 and count the entries and list them all…)

# Script grep_entries_alert.sh
if [ $# -lt 6 ]; then
FIN=`cat $1 |wc -l`
else FIN=`cat $1 |grep -n $5 |grep $6$ |head -n 1 |cut -d':' -f1`
fi
BEG=`cat $1 |grep -n "$3" |grep $4$ |head -n 1 |cut -d':' -f1`
NMB=`expr $FIN - $BEG`
ENTR=`cat $1 |head -n $FIN |tail -$NMB| grep $2|wc -l`
echo Number of Entries: $ENTR >log.log
if [ $# -lt 7 ]; then
echo ------- Complete List Of Entries and When ---------- >> log.log
for line in `cat $1 |head -n $FIN |tail -$NMB| grep -n $2|cut -d':' -f1`;do
LR=`expr $line + $BEG` # To get "real line", without the displacement
DAT=`expr $LR - 1`     # To get line date of entry
echo awk \'NR==$DAT\' $1 >>aux.sh # Printing the lines just calculted
echo awk \'NR==$LR\' $1 >>aux.sh  # with aux.sh
done;
sh aux.sh >>log.log
fi
cat log.log

It’s not beautiful. But it works! 🙂

After that, there is the new blog sponsor:
MacGyver-macgyver-880400_200_228
(Hahahaha)

Matheus.

Grepping Alert by Day

Hi all,
For that moment when your alert is very big and some OS doesn’t “work very well with it” (in my case was using AIX), I jerry-ringged the shellscript bellow. It puts in a new log just the log entries of a selected day.

24 7 365

The call can be made with two or three parameters, this way:

Parameters:
PAR1:
name of alert (the main alert.log)
PAR2: Day you want to, in the format “Mon dd”. Below an example.
PAR3: [optional] desired year. The default is the current year. But is useful specially on the “new year” period…

Examples:
Ex1: sh grep_day.sh alert_xxdb_1.log “Apr 12”
Ex2: sh grep_day.sh alert_xxdb_1.log “Apr 12” 2014

Generated files:
dalert_2015Apr12.log
dalert_2014Apr12.log

# Script grep_day.sh
if [ $# -lt 3 ]; then
YEAR=`date +"%Y"`
else YEAR=$3
fi
DATEFORMAT=`echo $2|cut -d' ' –f1`""`echo $2|cut -d' ' –f2`
BEG=`cat $1 |grep -n "$2" |grep $YEAR |head -1 |cut -d':' -f1`
FIN=`cat $1 |grep -n "$2" | grep $YEAR |tail -1 |cut -d':' -f1`
NMB=`expr $FIN - $BEG`
cat $1 |head -$FIN |tail -$NMB > dalert_$YEAR$DATEFORMAT.log

Belive me! It can be useful…. haha

See ya!

Matheus.